Posts

Showing posts from 2019

IMWAYR: 12.30.19

Image
It's been a crazy holiday break in Ohio. With temps in the 50s and 60s we've spent a lot of time outside. As the weather cools this week I hope to get in some major reading. I have 10 titles I'd like to finish before I return to school on Jan. 6. What are your reading plans for the rest of break?

A Reading Year in Review!

Image
2019 is coming to a close and I can honestly say there have been some amazing books that have hit the shelves this year. If you follow me and my lovely crew on Instagram or Twitter, or if you have been a loyal reader here on our blog, you have seen the books we have been crushing over all year.  This year I have spent a lot of time gathering and reading books that have characters of color and are written by authors of color. I have shared many of these books with you all here and via social media. I have also shared these titles with my students. I feel that it is so important to open our students eyes to the beautiful colors of the world!  I hope that you all have loved reading about all our reading adventures (good and bad) and about all the amazing authors we had a chance to meet and interview. I would also like to thank all of those authors for taking the time out of their busy writing schedules to talk with us and bring our readers inside information about the process of

Most Popular Books this Year...and What to Read Next

Image
This is not a definitive list of "best" books. With so many MG and YA books out there, it's truly impossible to narrow down our favorite reads of the first half of the school year. This list is focused on YA books that have been most frequently checked out of our classroom library. It doesn't include great MG titles like Barbara Dee's Maybe He Just Likes You or   Raina Telgemeier's newest graphic novel, Guts.   Or stunning debuts like Kate Allen's The Line Tender. Or even Jason Reynolds' brilliant novel in ten blocks, Look Both Ways . This list also doesn't include tried and true YA titles such as: All the Bright Places The Hate U Give Gym Candy The Memory of Things Children of Blood and Bone Scythe Heroine Refugee Hearts Unbroken The Crossover In short, there are a lot of brillant MG and YA books out there. And there are a lot more coming in 2020. I've paired some class favorites with soon-to-be-released titles. I hope you

Most Popular Titles in My 5th Grade..so far :)

Image
Every year is much more different than the last. Each student comes in their own, their own stories, their own memories, their own emotions. They find the stories that either help them escape these. They search for stories to help them not feel alone. Or they find those stories that help them to understand what their friends or other classmates are going through. As a lover of books, I choose what I read aloud wisely. Basing our read alouds primarily this year off of Project Lit - we started with Ghost by Jason Reynolds. Not long after students were fighting for Patina, then Sunny, and then Lu. You could say that introducing them to a series was definitely successful. Then we moved to A Long Walk to Water to review empathy and understanding of those that we may not always come into contact with. Students developed a deeper understanding in that moment about how good their life truly  is in comparison to others. Our last read aloud was Forget Me Not by Ellie Terry. Having the

Dare To Be You: Inspirational Advice for Girls

Image
Growing up, I was a big reader of Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul. I needed to be reminded of things that I would start to feel self conscious about as a young girl living in a world where judgement was everywhere. Luckily, I didn't grow up in the time where social media was so prominent, but I did grow up when it was first beginning. I remember MSN Messenger fights with girls, I remember chat rooms starting to become popular and people in the world were realizing that others weren't nice when behind a computer screen, I also grew up in a time when cell phones weren't full of easy access to anything and everything, but we did have three way calling and that could tear a girl down in a heartbeat. Luckily, I read, and when I did read learning about others experiencing things I felt - it helped to know I wasn't alone. Which is exactly what Dare To Be You does. It is just that, Inspirational Advice for Girls on Finding Your Voice, Leading Fearlessly, and Making a Differen

Eve 2.0 Blog Tour

Image
Welcome to the Teachers Who Read blog! Today we're featuring Eve 2.0, a new gaming novel sure to appeal to fans of Ready Player One or anyone who likes to game! Synopsis: Just when Gwen thought she could beat any video game hands down, her boyfriend goes and gets her stuck in a top-secret government simulator named Eve 2.0. Being trapped within a couple of her favorite video games doesn’t seem so bad at first, but as time becomes a factor and the A.I. program begins to get smarter, Gwen soon realizes that winning or losing isn’t just about pride anymore; it’s about making it out alive. My Take: Can you imagine being stuck in a video game? Some kids dream of that. In fact, 10-year-old me would've given anything to play a real-life version of Super Mario. And given that gaming is anticipated to be a 230 billion market by 2022 (New Zoo), I bet there's a few students you know who would appreciate this gaming novel. The first in a series, Eve 2.0 features suspens

IMWAYR 10.21.19

Image
It's Monday! There are not enough hours in a day. I had 10 books on hold at our library and four of them came in on the same day. Of course, within a few days, all of my Netgalley requests were approved. I'm going to finish Jackpot (so good!) tonight so I can focus all my attention to some 2020 releases!  Happy reading,

22 Days of Anti-Racist Resources for Teachers: Teaching Identity in Middle Grades

Image
This post is one of the series: It's Time to Talk Racism: 22 Days of Anti-Racist Resources for Teachers. Check out the complete campaign here.   Often times in schools, students aren't able to celebrate who they are and what makes them unique and special. It is unintentionally at times overlooked. Celebrating who we are and our difference can by the first step to breaking the bias we and our students have.  I start by discussing with my student what is identity and things that make up our identities. At times it may be hard for even my fourth graders to understand with identity is. I love the lesson from Being the Change to also help to teach and help my students understand identity. After we talk about the meaning, we start to look at ourselves and our own identities. My students do this writing on a piece of paper about how they identify themselves (boy, girl, black, white, student, teacher, sister, mother, brother, etc). Next, we talk about why is it important to k